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07

Nov

Introduction

Dear Readers,

My name is Jacob Andrew Davis and I am a student at Purdue University studying Management. I am currently a freshman trying to adjust to the college lifestyle and work course load. I was born and raised Noblesville, Indiana, a small town about 35 minutes north of Indianapolis. I came all the way to Purdue (hour and a half drive at most) to get a great education from one of the finest universities in the country.

This tumblr assignment is for my English 106 class. The assignment is to portray how sponsorship and patriarchy have affected my literacy through life. Each post shares something different either about how sponsors have affected my literacy development or about how patriarchy has had a defining role in my literacy development throughout my education career. “The Sponsors of Literacy” by Deborah Brandt and “Patriarchy: The System” by Allen G. Johnson are the two articles this assignment are based off of and where all of the information/quotations come from.

05

Nov

itssammimarie:

(Ideological Freight) Mr. Michael Tubridy was obsesed with the idea of going to church every Sunday. He would present articles to the class showing why everyone must go to church or else they would be considered a bad Christian. He was so passionate about going to church every Sunday it was as if he was telling the class, “Yall mothafuckas need Jesus”. It was obvious to our whole class that we knew what he was doing, he was trying to put the fear of God into us to go to church every Sunday.

This is something that I experienced when I was growing up as well. My parents never pushed me too hard about going to church, but my Sunday School class would push it really hard. They basically said the same thing, but in a different light. Although it didn’t affect my literacy all that much, it still had a role in my life. I can say, however, that it did have some ideological freight because the class I went to was provided to me and I was able to read some bible verses. I would always get the talk about how I needed to go every single Sunday and that I wasn’t going enough. They didn’t believe in excuses and didn’t think there was any reason to miss. I don’t agree with their approach to trying to make people go, but I get where they are coming from. This is one of the biggest things i remember from growing up because of how mean some of the people in the church were about going.

itssammimarie:

(Ideological Freight) Mr. Michael Tubridy was obsesed with the idea of going to church every Sunday. He would present articles to the class showing why everyone must go to church or else they would be considered a bad Christian. He was so passionate about going to church every Sunday it was as if he was telling the class, “Yall mothafuckas need Jesus”. It was obvious to our whole class that we knew what he was doing, he was trying to put the fear of God into us to go to church every Sunday.

This is something that I experienced when I was growing up as well. My parents never pushed me too hard about going to church, but my Sunday School class would push it really hard. They basically said the same thing, but in a different light. Although it didn’t affect my literacy all that much, it still had a role in my life. I can say, however, that it did have some ideological freight because the class I went to was provided to me and I was able to read some bible verses. I would always get the talk about how I needed to go every single Sunday and that I wasn’t going enough. They didn’t believe in excuses and didn’t think there was any reason to miss. I don’t agree with their approach to trying to make people go, but I get where they are coming from. This is one of the biggest things i remember from growing up because of how mean some of the people in the church were about going.

“If you can read this, thank a teacher.”
-Anonymous Teacher

Deborah Brandt defines sponsors as “any agent, local or distant, concrete or abstract, who enable, support, teach, or model, as well as recruit, regulate, suppress, or withhold literacy and gain advantage in some way” (Brandt 2). In most of our lives, a teacher is a sponsor of literacy we have. This quote displays how teachers have been our literacy sponsors and have taught us our literacy. (via waylon28)

My Response: I agree with you that our teachers are our literacy sponsors, and I think this quote proves thta point. If it wasnt for our teachers we probably wouldnt have been able to read the quote in the first place. I chose one of my teachers as my sponsor mainly because she showed me a series of books that I really enjoyed and I willingly read through the whole series. She was one of the only teachers to actually get me to read by choice and not for a project or homework.

(via jacobschueler3)

This is a creative saying. It is so simple but so clever and true. All you ever hear about is how school really doesn’t teach you anything and you’ll never use any of the information that you are learning. Then a saying like this comes about and should make everyone check their attitude towards school. The lessons learned and all of the little things that you learn all make up your literary skills just as much as going to English class and taking notes. Being able to read is something many look at as a given, when it is a literacy skill that has been drilled into your head since a young age to the point where it becomes second nature like it is now.

sysadminswift:

The picture shows my main sponsor—-my high school.

I can say that my high school was propably my 2nd biggest sponsor. Right behind the teachers of Apple Reading. But my high school prepared me for college the best it could have. At the time, I was stubborn and just wanted out of that place. I was tired of the teachers and the work and was ready to start the next chapter of my life. Looking back, the work was easy and I should have taken advantage of the resources that were right in front of me. Noblesville made sure that I was ready for college and did for the most part. There are some things that no one can be prepared for no matter what, but my high school raised my literacy skills and made sure that I was ready for the next step.

sysadminswift:

The picture shows my main sponsor—-my high school.

I can say that my high school was propably my 2nd biggest sponsor. Right behind the teachers of Apple Reading. But my high school prepared me for college the best it could have. At the time, I was stubborn and just wanted out of that place. I was tired of the teachers and the work and was ready to start the next chapter of my life. Looking back, the work was easy and I should have taken advantage of the resources that were right in front of me. Noblesville made sure that I was ready for college and did for the most part. There are some things that no one can be prepared for no matter what, but my high school raised my literacy skills and made sure that I was ready for the next step.

Topps Baseball Cards

nickcontino:

My father and I would always make trips to the baseball card store. I would love seeing the action shots of all the players and reading their names and their team’s name. My father knew that the cards could help me develop my literacy skills, but they also allowed me to learn some of the basics of baseball. In this way the cards carried ideological freight that was delivered to me through my father. According to Brandt, ideological freight “must be borne for access to what [the sponsors] have,” and my father had the ability to take me to the baseball card store (4). In doing so, he not only helped me develop my reading skills, but also ignited within me a love for sports. Presently I continue to follow and play sports regularly and they are a major part of my life.

This is similiar to my father and I’s relationship. My father and I never got into baseball cards, or baseball at that, but rather, we shared out passion for football. I started playing when I was in the 4th grade and I remember him driving me to every game on Saturday mornings. One thing we share is we hate being late. If you aren’t a half hour early, you were late. So we would show up early enough for every game on saturday that we could watch the workers spray the fresh lines on the field and just be able to be on the field before the game took place. The field was such a hectic place during gametime, but so quiet and peaceful in the early morning. This is something that I will never forget about the game, the little things my dad showed me that make the game of football so great that the normal person would overlook.

04

Nov

“One of the most difficult things to accept about patriarchy is that we’re involved in it, which means we’re also involved in its consequences” (Johnson 103).
Even as an Apple Reader, I experienced patriarchy. All of my teachers for my Apple Reading class where women. It may not seem like much, but while the advanced teachers for the “Bridges” class were all male, the Apple Reading staff was composed of all women. This is the same as the males being at the head of the department, except this time they’re just not at the bottom. It’s a different system, but it has the same outcome in patriarchy. This is hard to accept that as a struggling English student, I was unknowingly exposed to patriarchy in a almost unnoticed way.

31

Oct

Me:
When you think about the English department at Noblesville, who comes to mind?
Classmate:
Mr. Brady for sure. He is not only the most vocal but he is the coolest of the English teachers.
Me:
Why do you think he is the coolest?.. And what does that have to do with him being the head of the department?
Classmate:
He is one of the only guy teachers and he has cool subjects to write about. As the head of the department, he gets to pick and choose what his students write about.
Me:
Why do you think he is the head of the department?
Classmate:
I would say because he is a college professor as well and because he seems to have the most experience.
Me:
Do you think it has anything to do with the fact that he is one of only two males that teacher the 12 grade level English class?
Classmate:
Possibly. He tells all of the other teachers what to do and they seem to listen. So he is doing a good job.

Ideological Freight

Without the institution of Apple Reading at my elementary school, my literacy foundation would be skewed. It gave me access to the proper literacy materials that were at my skill level and made my learning experience smoother. With Apple Reading as a strong foundation, it allowed for me to learn at my own pace until I was ready to take my literacy skills to the next level and eventually get to the point were I was in the advanced English classes.

29

Oct

""Sponsors lend their resources or credibility to the sponsored but also stand to gain benefits from their success, whether by direct repayment or, indirectly, by credit of association" (Brandt 4)
Deborah Brandt said this in her article, “The Sponsors of Literacy,” talking about what a sponsor really is. Sponsorship can mean anything from being sponsored because you are famous, to having sponsor help with individuals with a specific trait. Literacy is something that most people don’t pick up on by themselves, sponsors are there to mentor and guide them through.   

21

Oct

Mr. Brady, my advanced english 111 teacher, taught us the skills that he knew would be put to the test at the next level. The relationship was reciprocal because we ended up helping eachother out by writing, we get the skills, and he gets to keep teaching the advanced class at my high school. This was one of my favorite videos my teacher showed my in high school.